“Stop throwing stones at trains,” urges KTM conductor to parents after train windows sustain cracks from vandalism

Source: redzuanmanaf87

The quality of local public transport has often been raised as a point of contention among Malaysians. And these complaints can often range from the frequency of busses and trains servicing certain stops, to the condition of bus and train carriages alike. However, where Keretapi Tanah Melayu (KTM) trains are concerned, some of these complaints have to do with the many cracked windows that are often found on their trains.

KTM train conductor urges parents to stop children from throwing stones at trains

In fact, instances of these damaged windows have become so commonplace that a KTM train conductor has taken to his own social media account to urge parents to prevent their children from throwing rocks at passing KTM train carriages, which have resulted in the damaged windows. TikTok user @redzuanmanaf87, who also refers to himself as Pak Su, had made the video in response to a comment asking why so many KTM trains were often seen with broken windows.

“I’m really calling upon all of you parents to please advise your children, advise your neighbours living around you, to avoid throwing rocks at Pak Su’s train.” he said.

The camera then pans to show the extent of damage incurred on one of the window-panes, which appears noticeably cracked across it’s surface but was otherwise intact.

Saying that these broken windows came about as an almost daily occurrence at this point, he points out that replacing the windows can be a very costly affair.

“Take pity on those riding in the train, take pity on Pak Su, take pity on all of those involved in this.

Tell your children, not to get itchy hands and remind them to take care of public property. This all belongs to us, not just to Pak Su.” 

His video, which has since gone viral, has attracted much support from netizens.

“I always ride KTM Komuter trains and see cracked windows. I used to think they just cracked on their own!”

Netizens have shown support for Pak Su and shared similar experiences in finding cracked windows on KTM train carriages. Source: TikTok
Netizens have shown support for Pak Su and shared similar experiences in finding cracked windows on KTM train carriages. Source: TikTok

“Parents need to teach their children from kindergarten.”

Netizens have shown support for Pak Su and shared similar experiences in finding cracked windows on KTM train carriages. Source: TikTok
Netizens have shown support for Pak Su and shared similar experiences in finding cracked windows on KTM train carriages. Source: TikTok

“They must be playing with slingshots. They can’t possibly strike a train by throwing with their hands.”

Netizens have shown support for Pak Su and shared similar experiences in finding cracked windows on KTM train carriages. Source: TikTok
Netizens have shown support for Pak Su and shared similar experiences in finding cracked windows on KTM train carriages. Source: TikTok

“I was told that the windows were meant to look like that, so that passengers could escape more easily should anything happen. I guess not!”

Netizens have shown support for Pak Su and shared similar experiences in finding cracked windows on KTM train carriages. Source: TikTok
Netizens have shown support for Pak Su and shared similar experiences in finding cracked windows on KTM train carriages. Source: TikTok

“How much does it cost to replace a window if it breaks?” 

“Info from KTMB staff said that it would cost about RM40,000, and it has to be ordered.”

Netizens have shown support for Pak Su and shared similar experiences in finding cracked windows on KTM train carriages. Source: TikTok
Netizens have shown support for Pak Su and shared similar experiences in finding cracked windows on KTM train carriages. Source: TikTok

Acts of vandalism are not uncommon on KTM trains

What’s more, the problem itself isn’t a new one as Malay Mail had previously reported in 2015 that KTMB had noticed that their trains commuting between Batu Caves and Port Klang were being pelted with stones by children, causing damage to windows.

“The broken windows are a nightmare to deal with. It takes three days to replace one window. The windows are expensive and are imported from the manufacturer in China.” said the spokesperson at the time.

Meanwhile in 2017, it was repoted by mStar that KTMB had incurred losses of over RM6 million due to acts of vandalism alone, the bulk of which was used to cover the cost of replacing cracked windows on train coaches.

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Also read: Will the 98-year-old Penang Hill train be shut down due to frequent breakdowns?

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